“The day I was born I was born free and that is my Privilege.”


Aroi Mak!
September 1, 2009, 3:40 pm
Filed under: Food, It's Asian, Khao Pad

This is a visit to Khao Pad, formerly known as the U.P. Thai Canteen, located near Home Depot at Julia Vargas Avenue in Ortigas, our first food place to set foot on in a gastronomic journey throughout the metro.

Pad Thai.  It’s difficult, almost a torture, to write about food this good.

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Khao Pad.  As opposed to what the ordertaker says, one serving is good enough for two persons.

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One reason that I should go back, I think, to Khao Pad is their chicken pandan. Its every bite is flavorful.

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Thai Noodles.  If served with chili while hot —  I haven’t done this as my empty stomach

prevented me from thinking straight — I think it will be delicious.

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This is where my journey as a food traveler begins.  Dream on, lady! Haha.

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Restaurant interiors

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We never got a photo taken with Mommy Thai, the store owner.  I had a chance to talk to her,  say that the food they offer is delicious, but what brilliance, I never thought of having a panoramic moment with her.  Oh, there’s always a next time.

The complete story about dining at Khao Pad I shall post soon, hopefully on a separate food blog.

All photos by Kat Paulino



Lo and Behold…
August 30, 2009, 9:06 am
Filed under: Tabloid

Here comes my enlightenment.

Stand up and congratulate me.

“Congratulations! Congratulations!”

It takes a text message to make me realize that I am still walking on the yellow brick road.  Now I say to myself, no, you have reached the castle.  You’ve splashed a bucket of water to Elphaba and you already had Nessarose’s little red glittery shoes.  Shout “Freedom” like William Wallace.   Survive reality because you own a brave heart.  What a citation! Hahaha!

I’ll just join John Nozuka as he sings After Tonight.

And after that, I’ll sway with James Morrison’s You Give Me Something.

And I  just miss this song, so I am including it here.

And I just went to check my dashboard, chanced upon this entry on drafts and never really remember the reason why I wrote those words above.  But I will post it anyway.

Oh, wait! I remember it now!



Dante’s Inferno on PSP in 2010
August 29, 2009, 4:38 pm
Filed under: Tabloid

All hope abandon, ye who enter here —  an inscription to the gates of hell in the words of Dante Alighieri in Inferno.  I never read the book, but I know of the title and its author.  As much as I want to read it, the stories are in verses that my plain mind had a hard time deciphering.   So let this game that EA will release on February of next year, if my memory serves me well, transport me to the depths of hell to accompany Dante in his journey.

I like hack and slash games especially in a story mode.   Maybe because I don’t want any interruptions except for a short  game cinematics.   That kind of gives an impression of being fast-paced.  The recent game of that type that I played is Daxter, and previous to that, Prince of Persia Rival Swords, both a revisit, just changing the games difficulty level from normal to hard.  The best hack and slash game for me would be God of War Chains of Olympus — good graphics; interesting story, at least for me, I like Greek mythology; and the gameplay is just great. That’s a 9 out of 10 rating from this gamer for Kratos’s journey up to the underworld in a battle with Persephone to save the world in a hope that the Gods will release him from the burdens of his past.

We are all waiting for the sequel of Chains of Olympus.  Rumors say that the God of War sequel will be released next year.  But for now,  let me just satisfy myself with one trailer of Dante’s Inferno.   And credits to my PSP buddies in the office who told me about Dante’s Inferno’s trailer release.



Nonsense: Read it at your own dismay.
June 9, 2009, 4:16 pm
Filed under: Tabloid

She thought of not being in a relationship at her age right now after a trip to nowhere alone.  I said to her that I’ve thought of that myself, too, but yet I am not ready for the scenarios like telling him every little thing that you decided to do with your momentary life like what color should I use if I have chosen to dye my hair.

To express oneself is as hard as showing apathy while you’re in a rollercoaster ride.   Tell me what to do.

I just want someone to hug, I said to another she.  Surprised, she told me to just grab a pillow and that my wish will be fulfilled.  Look for a mature one, she then advised me.  I asked her to qualify what she means by “mature.”  She typed in like bullet points — brave enough to face everything you two will go through in the relationship and the side of you that he doesn’t know yet, who knows insensitivity enough not to befriend it, who doesn’t get angry when you’re nearly misanthropic.  And I just listened as she tells her story following that.

I know about it but I don’t understand it.

That night I read a line in a book saying, “Flirting with alternative pasts only made it more difficult to face the present.” A memory flashed back and I refused to read for hours.



It’s fiction, non-fiction.
June 1, 2009, 3:35 pm
Filed under: Tabloid

I was on my bed last night reading Sara Backer’s American Fuji, a book I just snatched from my friend’s bookshelf when I went at her place last Sunday. I saw a John Grisham o a double-decker and asked her, while she was half-asleep, if I could borrow it. She mumbled a few words and pointed me to a collection of books on the table. I moved the bouquet of flowers on top of the stack and picked the one she recommended me reading.

Sleep refused to get through me yesterday even though the rainy weather kept on persuading me to close my eyes and dream. Reading a few pages lulled me to sleep, but I was awakened by the thought that there was something that I should be doing rather than rest. My mind is awake. I went to my brother’s room to get the guitar, played a few chords then went back to my room to continue reading the book.

The story centers on two individuals, both of them Americans, that is, Gabby and Alex. A former professor at a university in Tokyo, Gaby talks old men on how they want their remains be handled, how their last respects be done for a favorable price. At Gone With the Wind, her company, the package called “Fly Me to the Moon” is the most expensive.  “Liar,” the wife of her rich client called her after discussing its details to the old man. “One’s ashes will be transported to the moon, that is nonsense. It’s against the tradition,” she said.

You will be a part of everyone when you die, a molecule on a plant dew, your nucleus will be in the air that everyone breaths in; I read that in a book. And I kind of like that concept of death.

Gaby sells death, that’s what she does now.  But Gaby misses teaching, that cannot be denied. Lester often blames her for staying at her current work and not pursuing her passion. She was terminated at her teaching post a few years back, and the reason was not discussed to her in detail.  A Ph.D. holder, fluent in both English and Japanese, the dean tells his regret of losing a good teacher like her, but he also stresses out needing someone else to do her job.

In working at Gone With the Wind, she will meet Alex, an author by profession, a father whose son, a student in a university at Tokyo, died in a motorcycle accident a year ago. The details of his death was never known to Alex.  “Your company transported my son’s body in a casket back to America,” he said.  He also claimed he had transfer papers to prove it, but Gaby couldn’t find a record of it in their file.

That is to the extent of what I read. Telling their story is a relief and an alibi of not narrating mine. Merely because mine is a sad one. It involves greed, disrespect, deceit resulting to tears, confusion, anger, empathy which then turns to apathy.

One hour close to midnight I end this post.

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Brandon Boyd, believing in that 1 percent of a chance that you’ll read this,  I just want to say my deepest thanks for including my Ectoplasm post in your blog. Continue to inspire other people through your music and art.   I will wait for the release of  Monuments and Melodies  here in my country.  By the way, I love what you said in your recent interview with LiveDaily; that is,  “I hadn’t thought about the lyric in a long time — there’s a lyric in the song “Monuments and Melodies” that refers to where one has been and where one is going and being sort of in praise of the process of growth.”

Then let’s all move forward.

Now, that put colors on my dull cheeks.



Maybe I should write a travelogue.
May 8, 2009, 3:28 pm
Filed under: Tabloid

I need money for my travel expenses. It’s a dream to tour the world, pero sabi nga ni Nanay given the chance she’ll tour the Philippines first. So that’s what I am trying to do now.

One more Friday, two more of the rest of the days, then Quezon off I go with my lovely friends.

And Jandy texted me a little while ago, “Friend, sorry, pressure, book na kita ha. July tayo.” I replied a resounding yes. That will be our Cebu-Bohol trip. I really have to go! I missed the Puerto Galera and Potipot, Zambales adventures with them because of certain concerns, and I feel like I’m missing a whole lot. So I decided to say yes this time without the buts.

Takot ako sa idea ng plane ride. Di ako sanay sa adrenaline rush, sa Morning Rush lang. Hahahaha. But I should do this or I can’t say hello to my soulmate in Greece — haha — a place I really want to go to before I die.

I just realized am touring Visayas.  It’s Camiguin for Mindanao. I will eat Pastel there.  Yippeee!



Stranger, do I know you?
April 13, 2009, 1:27 pm
Filed under: Tabloid

A few entries from overheardeverywhere. com.

1. Edgar Allan Poe Was a Difficult Kid to Raise

Mother: Honey, do you remember mommy’s friend Denise?
Four-year-old son: Uh-huh.
Mother: Well, mommy has to leave right now, because Denise’s father passed away, and I have to go and tell Denise that I’m sorry.
Four-year-old son: Oh, did you kill him?

(Eeeekkk, Grissom, murder… — haha.. sensiya, CSI mode lang.)


2.  But If Enough Rain Builds Up, You Can Watch Me Walk on Water

Angry traveler: The flight’s canceled because of weather?!  Can’t you do something?
Airline counter man: Ma’am, despite my godlike appearance, I cannot control the weather.

(Grabeh, taas ng self-esteem! hahaha)

3. Hamburgers, That’s How

Non-native presenting for speech class:
Everyone has cows in their life. Cows at home. Cows at work. Cows in our families. Cows can take over everything. But how do we get rid of the cows?

Teacher: Chaos. It’s pronounced ‘chaos.’

(“Cows in our families,” lagot ka sa kapatid mo! Hahaha)

4. But Fantastic That You’re Keeping That Cultural Reference Alive

History professor, lecturing on the early 1900s: I mean, the problem of being the only person with a telephone is, well, who you gonna call?
Class (as one):  Ghostbusters!
History professor: You kids scare me.

(WAHAHAHA!)

5. Little Frasier and Niles Were Quite the Handful

Teen boy: (glares at brother, bites thumb)
Younger brother: Mom! He’s non-verbally quoting Shakespeare at me again!

(Brit humor ba to? Laurie?!)

6. And You Stole Me from a Playground!

Little boy (standing next to a car):  Daddy, this isn’t our car!  Daddy, what are you doing? This isn’t our car!
Man: Look, buddy, you’ve got to stop saying that when we’re in parking lots.

(To a couple walking by) I just got a new car.

Little boy: No you didn’t!

(Children are not liars, uh-uh.)

7.  Should I Write My Number on His Hand in Crayon?

Preschooler (left alone in stroller singing to 20-something girl walking by):  Cha, cha, cha… you’re charming!
20-something girl (on cellphone):  I think I just got hit on by a four-year-old! No, it was actually better than most of the lines I’ve heard.

(Ku-yut!)

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Irrelevant afterword:

Those, it seems, were the longest discourse I’ve ever written, with multiple exclamations after your name, least to say that I’m happy.  But look at what you’ve done, nothing.  Oh, thank you, nothingness! And today I will stick a bond paper on my room wall shouting in bold letters, “Get over it and move on.”

Absobloodylutely!